PatientHealth Care Professional
As an Ostomate, Renew Inserts may be suitable for you, but it is important you discuss this with your Healthcare Professional, prior to receiving a starter pack.
For further information please contact us on 0800 542 0814 or send an enquiry below.
It is important to discuss your symptoms with a Healthcare Professional prior to receiving a starter pack For further information please contact us on 0800 542 0814 or send an enquiry below.
As an Ostomate, Renew Inserts may be suitable for you, but it is important you discuss this with your Healthcare Professional, prior to receiving a starter pack.
For further information please contact us on 0800 542 0814 or send an enquiry below.

About ABL

Accidental Bowel Leakage (ABL), also commonly known as faecal incontinence, is the accidental passing of bowel movements, including solid or liquid stools or a mucus discharge from the anus. ABL is a debilitating symptom that affects men, women and children. Statistics suggest that 1:10 people are living with ABL and many struggle silently, unaware of potential treatment and management options. Understandably, feeling embarrassed is the most common reason stated by sufferers regarding seeking help and most admit avoiding speaking to their family or doctor about ABL.

Causes of ABL

The prevalence of ABL rises significantly in older individuals, with nearly one-in-40 sufferers being above the age of 65.

  • ABL may occur in isolation or it can also be a symptom associated with other health problems, including diarrhoea and chronic conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), diabetes,
  • A history of gall bladder surgery, damage or weakness of the muscles or nerves of pelvic floor, anus or rectum, or inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as proctitis.
  • Conditions such as haemorrhoids or prolapsed bowel may also lead to ABL.
  • A difficult childbirth with a history of instrumentation during labour can also predispose to ABL.
  • Constipation can also be a contributory factor; large hard stools build up over time and ABL occurs as a result of watery stools accumulating behind the solid stools. The liquid stool bypasses the blockage.
  • Certain medications may also aggravate loose stools and cause explosive bowel movements resulting in ABL.
  • Nerve damage due to brain or spinal cord injury or other neurological conditions, such as Dementia, Parkinson’s Disease, stroke, and Multiple Sclerosis can all affect the nerves supplying the pelvic floor, leading to ABL.

Seek help

NICE guidance CG49 is a useful guide for health care professionals and patients seeking more information about ABL.
Renew Medical UK would recommend that you seek support from your GP or local continence advisory service who will be able to assess your symptoms and offer options for ongoing management and treatment.
References NICE CG 49