PatientHealth Care Professional
As an Ostomate, Renew Inserts may be suitable for you, but it is important you discuss this with your Healthcare Professional, prior to receiving a starter pack.
For further information please contact us on 0800 542 0814 or send an enquiry below.
It is important to discuss your symptoms with a Healthcare Professional prior to receiving a starter pack
For further information please contact us on 0800 542 0814 or send an enquiry below.
As an Ostomate, Renew Inserts may be suitable for you, but it is important you discuss this with your Healthcare Professional, prior to receiving a starter pack.
For further information please contact us on 0800 542 0814 or send an enquiry below.

Antegrade Continence Enema

Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone antegrade colonic enema (MACE) is a procedure that is designed to help empty the bowel of faeces. The procedure allows the emptying of the bowel by using fluid (similar to an enema) that is inserted into a small opening in the side of the abdomen rather than into the rectum.

ACE surgery is performed when other methods to control constipation or faecal incontinence have not been successful. These other methods might include bowel training, dietary changes, medications taken rectally (suppositories or enemas), or medications taken by mouth. A stoma stopper can be worn between irrigations.

ACE Patient information guide.pdf

Mitrofanoff

Professor Paul Mitrofanoff created the Mitrofanoff (mi-trof-fan-off) procedure in 1976, also known as the Mitrofanoff Appendiciovesicostomy or a Continent Urinary Diversion. The Mitrofanoff was introduced to enable bladder drainage where voiding or urethral self-catheterisation is not possible.

The purpose of this operation is to form a channel between the bladder and the wall of the abdomen to allow intermittent self-catheterisation ie, drainage of the bladder. Ideally the Mitrofanoff is created from the appendix (or small bowel) which is mobilised on its blood supply. A section of the large bowel or fallopian tube can also be used. One end is tunnelled into the wall of the bladder to create a valve that acts as a continent mechanism, the other end is passed
through an opening in the abdominal wall to form a small stoma through which a catheter can pass to empty the bladder 4-6 times a day. A stoma stopper can be worn between each intermittent catheterisation.

mitrofanoffsupport.org.uk